day 7 – CaptureOne practice

for the next 10 days, will post a new CaptureOne Practice Edit…the short term goal is to see significant progress in working with this exciting program…

#7 – this is the first time I was able to effectively use layers, masks and the incredible CaptureOne Color Edit controls to even out the color on a few slightly browned areas of this magnificently colored Vanda (central image in this montage)…it took me some time to figure out how to achieve this.

Just love this program!

day 6 – practice CaptureOne

for the next 11 days, will post a new CaptureOne Practice Edit…the short term goal is to see significant progress in working with this exciting program…

#6 – yesterday was Member’s Day/Orchid Show 2020 at the New York Botanical Gardens. The show designer, Jeff Latham, installed a kaleidoscopic, reflective, structure at the main entrance. This was awesome! Can’t wait to go back when the crowds thin a bit, although no one bothered me sitting on the ground as close as I could get to the display:)

Kudos for CaptureOne again: color readouts, HDR adjustments recovered what appeared to be clipped highlights, and a tad of cropping, a pinch of sharpening and a smidge of structure gave this image extra pop. Just love this program!

The points on the Kapok tree are always on the agenda for every visit, and on occasion, don ‘t mind stepping back to get all the swirls of an orchid:)

day 5 – practice CaptureOne

deepOriginalCOps

for the next 12 days, will post a new CaptureOne Practice Edit…the short term goal is to see significant progress in working with this exciting program…

#5 – (above) layers allow significant in program control (in this case – masking, opacity, color balance & color edit adjustments). This version has much more even color in a small area of an unfurled petals of this beautiful rose in Peggy Rockefeller’s Rose Garden at The New York Botanical Gardens.

I needed to go into Photoshop to repair a very damaged petal on the lower right and in retrospect might leave it untouched in a future exercise.

deepLightroom-1

I was unable to adjust the lower right damaged petal in Lightroom (directly above)  and could not even out the color in the slightly unfurled petal in the middle left.  As the days go by, I am becoming more comfortable and pleased with the superior results of working in CaptureOne.

 

day 4 – practice CaptureOne…

unfamiliarCOn

for the next 13 days, will post a new CaptureOne Practice Edit…the short term goal is to see significant progress in working with this exciting program…

#4 – layers allow significant in program control (in this case – healing) and this version has significantly more even color in the blue petals of the orchid than a previous Lightroom edit. This CaptureOne edit matches my memory of the flower and hope to see something equally unique tomorrow when we visit the Orchid Show at The New York Botanical Gardens. Wait for this day every year!!!

day 3 – practice CaptureOne…

frighteningFocusMask

for the next 14 days, will post a new CaptureOne Practice Edit…the short term goal is to see significant progress in working with this exciting program…

#3 – this tool is simply humbling, more so than an impolite critique and we’ve all been thru those:) and makes a case for also trying CO tether!

Macro focus is a challenge for me…my first photography professor looked at an image and “sorta sniffed” and whispered “depth of field”…so for years f11 just always felt right…it still does, although recently have been exploring the opposite. On one hand, it feels liberating to open up my aperture to the max and actually get a strand of focus in just the right spot.

So the Focus Mask display in CaptureOne is a fantastic reality check. And, it’s also important to keep in mind personal values in terms of style and experimentation.

 

Botanical Elements is a finalist…

Inspired by my first large format botanical pano, I then created this montage in November for my final portfolio presentation at SCSU. Several elements were photographed on location at the New York Botanical Gardens (the central bubble abstract in the pool room, a birch fragment glowing in the afternoon sun, and Juncus Effusus from the Burle Marx exhibit this past summer). Several elements were photographed in my studio in New Haven, CT.  The central green orchid is a Paphiopedilum Citron hybrid from White Plains Orchids; and the midori green antherium and iris are from Compo Farms in Westport, CT. The fern is a box store patio plant, the red maple is on our front lawn and the majestic ginkgo is across the street.

This pano is one of two chosen as finalists for the month of December 2019:
http://www.artroomgalleryonline.com/exhibitions/2019/december_2019.html

BotanicalElements